Contributed by
Dona Lu Snyder
[Christmas Dome] Dona Lu Snyder sends this Christmas-card picture of her dome blending into the snow-covered landscape. Click the small picture at left to see a full-sized version. (It’s pretty big, too — about 870 pixels wide.) (Or… you can take a look at a Photoshop-edited version.)
Contributed by
Bruce Ward
Click on the small picture here to open a larger one in a separate window.
[building panels - 1] Bruce Ward built this dome of foam panels.In September, 1999, he wrote:

I spent parts of three days (Saturday the 11th, and Sunday/Monday of Labor Day weekend) making a 20′ diameter 3-frequency dome in my yard using the chord factors supplied by Trevor Blake a while back. Total materials cost for a 1″ shell was under $450 at the local Home Depot. Read the rest of the story…

Contributed by
Dave Baer
[building panels - 1][building panels - 2] Dave Baer contributed this series of pictures showing how he built triangular panels for one of his domes. Notice the miters and angles on the edges of the panels. Click on the small pictures here to see larger ones, which will open in a separate window.[building panels - 3]      [building panels - 4]
[Dave's dome - 1] Dave also sent this series, showing stages in the construction of a wooden strut dome, built in 1980. It’s a 35-foot, 3v (“v” is shorthand for “frequency”) icosahedral 5/8 sphere on a 2-foot riser wall, with a slab foundation.
[Dave's dome - 2] [Dave's dome - 3]      [Dave's dome - 4]      [Dave's dome - 5]
Contributed by
Tony Kalenak
Click on the small pictures here to view larger ones in a separate window.
[Tony's fabric dome][Tony's fabric dome]

[Vent at top]

[Vent at top]

[tent]

Tony Kalenak built this fabric-covered dome that pretty much fills up his back yard. He writes:

This dome is made of EMT struts, bolted together and covered with Polyethylene film. It is a very simple but effective fabric attachment system. It uses common materials. It has proven itself in 41 mph winds (so far) without loss or degradation of plastic (though it does tend to want to play “parachute”!). It took 1 person (me) approximately three 8-hour days to assemble. It is approximately 16 feet tall and 36 feet in diameter.The 2 inside shots are of the vent at the top of the dome. It is actuated by a rope leading down to the base.

Tony’s latest project is shown in the bottom picture.

This is a prototype of a Personal Dome (PD). It measures 16′ at the base and 8 feet tall. The large triangle in the front is the entrance. This model has a flap closure over the entrance. It is a simple system that uses common materials. It uses a plastic fabric stretched over a tubular frame. The fabric attachment system is self-tensioning and it maintains tension for the life of the fabric. It exhibits very little flapping even in high winds, which, in turn, increases the life of the fabric. The dome uses a modular strut system, so that you can increase the size of your dome by adding additional struts to your current dome. Initial Projected price is $400 (not including freight or sales tax).

Contributed by
Mark McMurtry
[parallel[parallel Listmember Magic Rainbow Trout says that the term “parallel tropics” “…sounds like Hawaii, the Caribbean, and Cancun all lined up…” but Mark McMurtry defines it as “…a configuration where all the ‘horizontal’ chords are parallel with the ground (foundation). Makes foundations much simpler for dome heights that are not 1 radius. Makes 1/5, 1/4, 1/3, etc., heights possible.” …and he offers the two illustrations you see here. (Click on each to see a full-sized image that will open in a separate window.)You can read more about parallel tropic dome architecture (and see more pictures) at the Web site of Triodetic Building Products Ltd.
Contributed by
John Moon
[Scwedler More about parallel tropic domes:John Moon of Geodesics Unlimited sends these pictures he generated to illustrate parallel tropic domes. (Click on the small pictures to see larger versions in separate windows.) Shown at the left is a plan view of what John refers to as a Schwedler dome, characterized by radial ribs.
[Schwedler Shown at the left is a side view of the Schwedler dome, shown above.
[Diamatic The diamatic dome has a pattern that expands radially, which is repeated around the dome.
[Diamatic Shown here is an elevation view of the diamatic dome, shown above.
[Lamella Lamella dome plan view: The lamella dome does not have radial ribs but does have a pattern that is repeated radially around the dome.
[Parallel Shown here is a side view of the lamella dome, shown above.
[dihedral angles] 4v Icosahedron Shown at left is a diagram of the internal angles and strut lengths of a 4v icosahedron. These are repeated symetrically around the broken-down icosahedral face.
[dihedral angles] 4v Icosahedron Dihedral angles, which are repeated symetrically around the face.
Dome of
Rick Colman
Click on the small picture to open a new window to Rick’s Web site.
[Elevation Rick’s Web site was submitted to us by Kevin Frawley, of Energy Structures, Inc., who writes:

One of our customers is documenting his dome building project in great detail with photos and a diary format that I am sure others would like to follow his progress. They can access it from our homepage at http://www.intlist.com/esi.htm or go directly to his site at http://www.isd.net/msp02262/Journal.html

The site includes photographs of the work in progress (including the early stages of digging trenches for installation of the geothermal temperature control system), as well as Rick’s journal. He shares with us a daily record of his domebuilding progress — interesting reading for those of us who are preparing to embark on the same journey.In addition to his work-in-progress photos, Rick’s posted somedrawings and floorplans.

Contributed by
Derek Jacoby
[Floor Derek writes:

My 40′ Natural Spaces dome is coming along. I now have a foundation and part of a lower floor slab. … I am installing radiant heating and having the slab stamped in a slate pattern, which is what the pictures are showing.

Derek’s roof was completed in September, 1999. You can see pictures of Derek’s building progress at his website.Click on the small picture at the left to go to Derek’s Web site.

Contributed by
Denis Davis
[Bubble Denis has a system for mounting acrylic bubble windows — good for windows as well as skylights. The pictures here show the panels and how they fit together. You can see more pictures at Denis’ Web site.Click on the small pictures to see larger versions, each in a new window.
[Bubble    [Bubble    [Bubble[Bubble    [Bubble    [Bubble   [Bubble
Contributed by
Reg Monroe
[Reg's cluster] Reg writes:

I have been doing research on multi-storied, clustered domes for about 20 years. All work is still theoretical, as of yet, but I think it has potential. The graphics I created in LightWave 3D.

Reg chose this picture to contribute because of the DomeHome List discussions about surface embellishment.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version, about 473K, which will open in its own window.

Contributed by
Jeff Dailey
[Jeff's Dome Project] Jeff sends a picture of this 26-foot dome project. It’ll be covered with four inches of blue foam.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version in a new window.
Contributed by
Alan and Carolyn Poulter
[Summer[Winter Alan and Carolyn’s dome in Southern Ontario, shown here in both summer and winter. Carolyn writes:

This is such a wonderful place to live in. I just can’t express it properly.
Oh yes and as you can see… Canadians do live in igloos 😉

Click on each small picture to see a larger version in a new window.

Contributed by
Don Sturgeon
[Sturgeon's[Sturgeon's Don Sturgeon sends these pictures of some dome homes near Haliburton, Ontario; nice photos that show how a dome home can fit into its surroundings.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version, which will open in its own window. If you want to see the REALLY BIG versions, click on these links for Big Picture 1 and Big Picture 2. These pictures are over 200K, so they may take a while to load.
Contributed by
Brian Burns
[Burns' dome] Brian Burns sends this picture of his dome-in-progress, and writes:

A completed shell, decking and landscaping will wait till spring.

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version in a separate window.

Contributed by
Ernie Aiken
[20-foot Ernie Aiken sends this photo of a 20-foot wooden hub-and-strut system in Colorado Springs, to be covered with 7/16″ wafer board and stucco type finish. You can see a whole gallery of his pictures; also, check out his Worldflower Garden Domes Web site.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version in a separate window.
Contributed by
Fabien Pichard
[Fabien's house] Subscriber Fabien Pichard writes in to tell us about the dome house he and his wife have just found in Seattle. He created this website so his parents, who live in France, would be able to follow the changes he plans to make inside the house. On his website, he gives lots of info about the house and its construction.Click on the small picture at the left to go to Fabien’s website and see a larger version.
Contributed by
Brian Burns
[Brian Burns' dome in progress] Brian writes:

Pat from GDI arrived with our 39′ Sierra II dome packed into a Ryder truck on Friday, the 16th of October. With the help of 4 family members and friends, we had a most enjoyable weekend, despite the rain on Saturday. In just over 2 days the shell was completed and the feeling of accomplishment brought everyone closer together, not unlike an old-fashioned barn raising!

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version of Brian’s work-in-progress.

Contributed by
John Rich
[non-spherical Click on the small picture at left to view a whole page full of pictures of domes John’s designed and built. John is a proponent of non-spherical geodesics. Among other things pictured here are “a four-frequency superellipsoidal icosa,” and “a longitudinally-cut 3v icosa egg with a chop out and free form flow.” You can also view a page of calculations comparing construction elements based on a superellipse with those based on a sphere. John invites feedback, and you can request more information from him at geodesicsnz@netscape.net.
Contributed by
HeyJim!
[swirly One of the unexpectedly interesting threads on the DomeHome List has been the “Swirly Doors” discussion about an “irising” opening for a dome house. Jim started playing with some ideas….
Contributed by
Forest Brown
[a Forest Brown sent in this URL that shows pictures of the phases of construction of a Cathedralite Dome kit. The pictures also show the finished interior.This manufacturer is no longer in business, but sometimes their kits can still be found.

Click on the small picture at the left to view the pictures.

Contributed by
Ingrid Buxton
[Ingrid's Interior] Ingrid Buxton writes:

“…the stack in the middle of the dome is designed for moving air. Fans are used to vent air from cooking, the dryer, etc. I will use fans that can be flipped to suck air from the basement, or blow warm air up, and by regulating the vents move air in and out. In addition, the second floor walls do not continue up to the vault. They stop and are topped by windows that will be open most of the time for air circulation. I don’t have the “3rd” floor plan, but that is a cupola with windows all around.

Click on the small picture at the left to go to Ingrid’s Web site.

Contributed by
Steve Cottrell
[Steve's BuckyBall-to-Be] Steve sent this drawing in along with his DomeHome Surveyresponse. He writes:

“Please find … enclosed a jpg of my Bucky-ball to be.”

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version in a new window.

[composite Steve also sent this composite image of some floor plans and conceptual models. When I asked him what CAD or modeling program he uses on his Mac, he answered:

Would you believe plain old ClarisWorks [draw]? Okay it’s only 2D but hey I’m a humble guy. Actually quite amazing what one can accomplish with it. I do floorplans and from-scratch exterior views in CW, then incorporate them into impossibly cool background vistas in Photoshop 3. Yes 3… I’m not a heavy user by any stretch, and I couldn’t possibly afford to update to 4 or 5 — much rather spend the money on other things, like RAM to handle large image files, and version 3 suits me fine.

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version in a new window.

Contributed by
Scott Fraser
[Scott's Helmet House] Scott writes, from Dunbarton, New Hampshire:

“Thought you folks might enjoy a picture of my rather unusual house; albeit not a dome home, nevertheless, it is still one of a kind.”

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.

Contributed by
Jason Ebacher
[Jason's Pyramid House] List contributor Jason Ebacher shared with us drawings of his house that started out to be a dome… but ended up as a variation on a pyramid design.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
Contributed by
Michael Rowland
[Carol & Rowley's Barn] Round Barn This is a drawing of the first dome project my wife and I will undertake together (not counting the Almostphere). The base consists of 10 steel corral panels (the kind commonly found at any farm and home store) which happen to be the same length as one of the longer struts of a geodesic sphere the same size as the Almostphere (i.e., 10-foot struts for a 30-foot-diameter hemisphere). So, we’re basically going to form a round pen of corral panels, then set a hemisphere atop them. I’ve drawn this to scale as nearly as I can. This is a side view. Since this is a work in progress, I’ll post details, later, showing how the dome will be attached to the corral panels, and how roof sections will be attached to the dome. The plans ultimately call for wedge-shaped stalls to extend outward from each corral panel, covered by shed roofs. For this stage, we’ll replace the corral panels with a permanent post and beam construction; until then, it’ll be portable. — jmrClick on the small picture at the left to see a larger version, 640 pixels wide.
[tensegrity[tensegrity Tensegrity House These drawings were done as a very simple illustration of an idea to build a structure with as few main structural members as possible. At first, I envisioned telephone poles, but decided that to get the spatial dimensions I wanted, these would have to be 50 feet long. So, these members could be wooden timbers or steel pipes, etc., and if represented here to scale, would be approximately 2 feet 8 inches in diameter. I chose this scale so that the top and bottom levels of the structure would be about 10 feet tall. As illustrated, the structure would yield as much as 7500 square feet of floor space, not including the area on the ground directly underneath the lowest deck. Some of this space would be enclosed by lightweight walls suspended from the decking above (the side view shown here was an early version showing tent fabric suspended from the cables), and the rest, including the top deck, would be open balcony. (So the encosed floorspace would be closer to 3,000 – 5,000 sq.ft.) The question of what materials could handle the stresses involved, I leave to an engineer. — jmr
Turtle House pillow domeTurtle House stucco dome Turtle House I’ve long thought that the turtle’s shell is a geodesic structure, and that it might be adapted as a house. (For humans.) The two drawings shown here were done from scans of an actual turtle shell (eastern box terrapin), with the bony plates idealized into geodesic shapes. Though the actual shell has plates that look like heptagons and other, more complex polygons, here they’ve been simplified into the pentagon and hexagon shapes that make up most geodesic domes. The top picture shows such a structure rendered as a pillow dome, with clear bubble sections inside all the struts. The second drawing shows the same thing but with a stucco-like texture covering the struts. Clicking on either of these thumbnail pictures will open a bigger version in a separate window. — jmr
Contributed by
Peter J. Bidiss
[Pete's Dome] Peter writes:

“My home is situated in the Adelaide foothills and is the nicest home anyone could hope for. It has an airy but cosy feel. I would recommend this style of house to anyone who can cope with stairs.”

Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.

Contributed by
Yves Accard
Click on the small pictures here to see a larger version. Each will appear in a new window.
[DomeSpace] Yves sends three pictures. The pictures are big and beautiful… I’ve sized them down here to fit inside a standard 14″ monitor’s browser window. But you can also download the full-size versions.The first one is of a house built by DOMESPACE, a French company.
(Click here to download the full-size version.)
[Elephant] Yves writes:

Elephant.jpg shows a concrete dome made by a friend of a friend (an artist).

(Click here to download the full-size version.)

[borla] Yves writes:

Borla.jpg shows the house of the sister of my wife (you see my wife in the picture). I constructed this house in 1981 with 4 friends.

This picture shows two views of the house.
(Click here to download the full-size version.)

Domeraising pictures contributed by
Janet Snow
[Dome[Dome

[Dome

[Dome

[Dome

[Dome

Click on the small pictures at the left to see a larger version. Each will appear in a new window.Janet writes:

The weekend was a big success !!! Even the weather cooperated.The crew was a little slow in showing but there were more than enough hands available by mid-morning. We were able to complete the erection of the framework and the first ring of sheathing by the end of the day Saturday. On Sunday, we completed sheathing the dome (in spite of nail gun problems).

In preparation, I had completed all the strut framework and plywood sheathing panels. The folks from Pacific Dome Systems arrived a couple days early to help set up the riser walls and build the extension arches, and pretty much ran the show for the weekend. (Thanks guys!)

Everyone had a great time, and it was the talk of the office Monday, with those who were involved quite proud of themselves and their accomplishment.

Janet

Contributed by
Don Sturgeon
[Don Sturgeon's Dome] UPDATE:
“Our Duct Tape Dome before shingles/ Do not use grey Peel and Seal or this is what you get!”Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
Contributed by
Dr. David R.
[Bill Chamberlin's dome, during construction] “This is Bill Chamberlin’s 40′ high profile Natural Spaces Dome in NY, built on a riser wall with two one-story extensions and one two-story extention. I was there from day one and helped build this grand dome! Got to really appreciate the Natural Spaces design!”Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version, with multiple views.
[Bill Chamberlin's dome, finished] These are pictures of the finished structure.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version, with multiple views.
Contributed by
Brenda Myers
[Front] The front of Brenda’s dome.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
[stairwell The stairwell in the center of the dome, looking thirty feet up.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
[side The view from the side.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
[frame The frame with cutouts for extensions.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
Contributed by
Bob and Elaine Vance
[completed Bob and Elaine Vance’s domehome:With a little help from their friends, they had a completed shell up in about 18 hours. You can view some interesting progressive pictures of the domeraising at their website.

Click on the small picture at the left to visit the Vances’ Website.

Contributed by
Tony Kalenak
[Tony Tony Kalenak’s Cardboard Dome.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
[Plans Build your own cardboard dome.Download 9″ x 14″ versions of Tony’s drawings in bmp format.Drawing 1 gives dimensions for the two different sized panels, and Drawing 2 shows how they go together, with notes on assembling them. Note that these files are “binhexed” for downloading…. To decode them, use StuffIt Expander or a similar utility.
Contributed by
John Kuhtik
[Kuhtik's John Kuhtik’s Fly’s Eye Dome.Click on the small picture at the left to see a larger version.
Contributed by
Jay Salsburg
[Jay Jay Salsburg’s NebulaDome.Click on the small picture at the left to go to Jay’s Website and see a larger version.
Contributed by
Bill Palmer
[Meeting TRI-LEA-EM’s Friendship Hall.Click on the small picture at the left to see a bigger view in a separate window. Visit TRI-LEA-EM’s Website and see more info on this Oregon Domes structure, including floor plans and a complete annotated photo-documentation of the building progress.
Contributed by
Michael Rowland
[The Almostphere] Some pictures of the Almostphere.Click on the small picture at the left to go see the Almostphere pictures.
After the Storm [After the storm] These pictures show how well some geodesic domes weathered a storm that devastated their neighbors.Click on the small picture at the left to go to the Geodesic Domes and Homes site.
Contributed by
Dennis Johnson
[Dome Raising] Dennis Johnson of Natural Spaces Domes documented the progress of a dome-raising that took place on Topsail Island, North Carolina. They had a digital camera on-site and during the first two days, they posted picture updates every couple of hours.Click on the small picture at the left to go view the pictures.
Contributed by
Patrick G. Salsbury
[freq3 sphere rendering] Patrick Salsbury, administrator of the DomeSteading email list (and several others) produced this rendering of a 3-frequency icosahedron dome, using Rick Bono’s freeware “Dome” software. This is a full-sphere rendering of a hemispherical dome structure that Pat is in the process of moving into, even as I write this.Click on the small picture at the left to view the full-size rendering at Pat’s Reality Sculptors website.
Contributed by
Simon Sunatori
[squirrel-proof bird feeder] Here’s a different use for the dome shape. Simon Sunatori has designed a bird feeder that squirrels can’t raid. He writes:

Squirrels never succeeded in beating my Squirrel-Proof Bird Feeder Device in 2 years, except for 1 (one) occassion when the snow bank was 1 metre high.Besides house sparrows, the birdfeeder attracts blue jays and cardinals every day. There is a diagram and a couple of photos at the website. The big problem is that I have to refill it every 2 days!