Minneapolis Pilots A More Equitable Way To Fund Park Improvements

With its chain of lakes and acres of open space, Minneapolis has a nationally lauded park system. But as of 2015, its smaller neighborhood parks faced a capital investment backlog of more than $100 million, a shortfall that translated to aging structures, walkways full of potholes, and soccer fields that had been ground into mud.

[caption id="attachment_25" align="aligncenter" width="657"] A closed tennis court in Folwell Park.[/caption]

Vina Kay, the executive director of the Minnesota-based advocacy organization Voices for Racial Justice, says one can see an ugly pattern in which parks are in the worst shape. “If you were to go on a visual tour, you would see that some parks are more run-down than others and that those parks are most often in low-income communities of color,” Kay says. In response, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board recently developed what its members hope is a more equitable system of park priorities.